Klingon Imperial Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
12 11, 2017, 07:01: PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Thu 26Jul2012:
     Due to security issues file attchments are disabled for the time being.  We are invenvestigating the impact to the board and working to ensure our forums are clean and trustworthy.   In the mean time you can email your attachments to Kesvirit and/or Klythe along with which message you want them attached to and we will add them.
   
11894 Posts in 1664 Topics by 689 Members
Latest Member: regdun234
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  Klingon Imperial Forums
|-+  Klingon Guilds
| |-+  Klingon Imperial Costumers Guild
| | |-+  Make-up & Headpieces
| | | |-+  Klingon headpiece material?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Klingon headpiece material?  (Read 27309 times)
krieger
Newcomer

Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« on: 10 12, 2003, 06:39: AM »

posted on 6-30-2002 at 03:11 AM

Headpiece material?

Any thoughts on the relative merits of liquid latex, latex foam or slush foam? Any other materials in current use?
« Last Edit: 12 18, 2003, 02:55: AM by Ambassador Lady K'Zin » Logged
kratnor
Scribe
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


« Reply #1 on: 10 12, 2003, 06:41: AM »

posted on 6-30-2002 at 05:44 AM

headpiece material

I've never used foam or slush foam.
Latex or mask latex with plaster molds give smooth results. I would think Foam latex, ie latex with air in it would result in rough pitted material. But I am just a novice. Fairly thin latex poured into the mold repeatedly gives you control on the thickness of your piece. What do you know of these 'foam' varieties and what's their use?
kra'tnor
 
Logged
Chuzat
KIDC Member
Novice
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


WWW
« Reply #2 on: 10 12, 2003, 06:43: AM »

posted on 6-30-2002 at 10:38 PM

The headpiece I'm currently working on started as a full-head Klingon costume mask that I found on eBay. It looked rather poor considering it was an official Paramount costume, so I've modified it.
I wanted to make one from scratch, but couldn't find anybody to put my head in plaster, so I've taken this mask, cut it up and reshaped it so it only has the nose piece, forehead and skull left.
I'm currently adding hair, piece by piece, or tuft by tuft (sorta like old hair replacement surgery, only with thinner tufts), and I'll fill the underside with latex to add firmness and seal in the hair when I've added it all.
Hopefully it will be satisfactory when I'm done. If not, I'll have to wait until I can afford to pay Paramount for a full uniform.
They are selling a Klingon Make-up kit at the Star Trek: The Experience, but I don't know about the quality, I didn't get a good look at the contents while I was there.
good luck
Logged
krechoq
Newcomer

Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« Reply #3 on: 10 12, 2003, 06:46: AM »

posted on 6-30-2002 at 11:45 PM

Headpiece Material

Each of the three materials has specific advantages and drawbacks.
Regular Latex readily accessible and does give a smooth finish, but for skin - do you really want a smooth surface. It is also relatively hot to wear.
Foam Latex has a more skin-like texture and is the coolest of the three options, but it scrafices durability due to frays and tears.
Slush Latex is relatively easy to use, can have a textured or smooth finish, and is very durable. However, it is probably the most difficult to wear because of heat retention.

The best source of information on this would be the genetics officer on an established ship. Good luck warrior...
May your eyes and blade remain sharp...
K'rechoq
Logged
qurgh
Novice
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #4 on: 10 12, 2003, 06:50: AM »

posted on 7-1-2002 at 03:38 AM

I have a latex forehead, and it's very very hot, but it lasts a long time. This is one of the easiest headpieces to make, as the latex is just brushed (don't pour you'll get bubbles) into a mold.

I have a friend who showed me his foam latex head piece and it was much lighter and much cooler to wear. He didn't take it off for 3 days and 2 nights. They are harder to make because they fequire "cooking" in an oven, and they don't last as long as regular latex.
Logged
BuraD
Scribe
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13


« Reply #5 on: 10 12, 2003, 06:52: AM »

posted on 7-2-2002 at 03:25 AM

Headpieces

I wear a latex headpiece.
We all do our own castings and designs, taking a casting of our heads, making a positive of that, designing our own ridges, making a mold of that, and then using the mold to make headpieces.
This way you have a custom fitted piece that fits and is your own unique design. Makes it easy to have Houses with the individuals all with custom fitted pieces that are similar, as they should be, but with individualized differences.

My headpieces are done using (I kid you not) Woodland Scenics latex. Yeah, model railroading latex. It's more durable and less likely to tear than the theatrical stuff, and you brush it into the mold, as it is a glop instead of a liquid. I also embed a layer of cheesecloth between the inner two layers of the headpiece...it gives it a lot more strength, and enables me to actually use my sewing machine to sew my wigs on.

We are beginning to experiment with a new gelatin foam, as we have two members who work in the medical profession who have over the years developed an allergy to latex. As we work with it I'll post what we discover.

Some of our guys wear purchased foam latex headpieces, and they are in fact lighter and cooler. However, they don;t last more than about a year in our experience. The edges deteriorate.
Logged
qIHot
Newcomer

Offline Offline

Posts: 2


WWW
« Reply #6 on: 10 12, 2003, 07:11: AM »

posted on 7-31-2002 at 09:47 PM

headpiece material

Here is one resource for the "foaming gelatin" material mentioned above: http://www.bitstorm.net/mdftv/
It would be interesting to hear from anyone who has tried it.
qIHot
Logged
kitara
One Post Wonder

Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #7 on: 10 12, 2003, 07:13: AM »

posted on 9-21-2002 at 02:37 AM

Head piece

A few years ago I made a cheap head piece. I got a bald cap and a couple of packages of fake skin. I cut the bald cap in half and made two and made the fake skin to what ever design that suited my fancy. But they were ruined when I moved to from one state to another. But I'm thinking of trying again this year by getting another bald cap, cutting a hole in the back for my hair and put q tips underneith to give it a bumpy look and glueing it. It's worth a try. kitara
Logged
Jazzcat
One Post Wonder

Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #8 on: 10 12, 2003, 07:15: AM »

posted on 1-19-2003 at 08:32 AM

Quote
Originally posted by qIHot
Here is one resource for the "foaming gelatin" material mentioned above: http://www.bitstorm.net/mdftv/ It would be interesting to hear from anyone who has tried it.
qIHot
****************
The URL will be changing soon so bookmark the new one: http://www.bitstorm.net/mdftv/
vIghro' >^..^<
Logged
KAllen
Klingon Conversationalist
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 140



WWW
« Reply #9 on: 10 12, 2003, 07:17: AM »

posted on 1-20-2003 at 04:54 PM

Everybody on my ship uses a bald-cap w/ wig hair sewn directly to it. We then use plain ol' silicon to design the ridges and then cover the headpiece w/ liquid latex. I use just regular theatrical make-up to color the headpiece. Its basic, but looks pretty real compared to many others out there...and a h*ll of a lot better than the "official" headpiece.
 
Logged

Lt.Col. K'Allen sutai-bortaS
Marine Commander aboard the IKV Bayou Serpent
Member of the IKV Bayou Serpent
House Cha'diCH to the House of bortaS
ChonBey
Newcomer

Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #10 on: 10 12, 2003, 07:21: AM »

posted on 2-24-2003 at 07:04 AM

The foam latex I'm told is a lot cooler but is not very durable, as others here have said.

A few on our ship had the commercially produced foam ones, but they've worn out (the foreheads, not the crew) and now all our crew use slush poured latex. Very durable. Place a pantyliner inside to absorb sweat so you don't suddenly have a half cup of salty sweat pouring into your eyes.

BTW, that link for foaming gelatin is changing to:
http://www.michaeldavy.com/

Here's a friend of mine who put up instructions on headcasting:
http://www.celtic-klingon.com/
Logged
qoSagh
Warrior Bard of the Ontological
Thought Master
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1166



WWW
« Reply #11 on: 03 26, 2004, 11:01: PM »

I have had my Latex headpiece for over 10 years and it is still going strong. The worst problem I have had with it is actually due to latex & pros-aid (the glue) buid up on the edges, it is much more noticable and harder to blend to my face than it used to be. I am probably going to make a new one this year or early next year. I am currently looking into a modified casting method where I cast the headpiece itself and build up the inside of the new one to get it back to a near custom fit.

One thing that has helped mine keep it's shape is a hard epoxy liner that was put in when it was made. This does make it harder to carry and store. I now keep mine on a styrofoam wig stand, inside a hat box. This keeps it safe but also means an extra piece of luggage.

I have also found that wearing a bandana under the head piece absorbs most sweat and helps cool me down. The latex only goes from brow back to about halfway across my head, the wig covers the back, with no latex underneath.

 
Logged

qoSagh qlIStIy
meycha of the qaptaQ www.qaptaQ.org
Prothonotary of the Desert Rite
"I would kill the children of a thousand planets, just to see you smile."
GravityMaster
Novice
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5



WWW
« Reply #12 on: 04 20, 2004, 12:51: PM »

Here is my two cents worth:
Ref:
> The worst problem I have had with it is actually due to latex & pros-aid
> (the glue) buid up on the edges, it is much more noticable and harder to
> blend to my face than it used to be.
I've been using a nose prosthesis for @ 10 years now.  Still have the original but adhesive build up was a problem.  Then I discovered the thinner for the specific adhesive.  The process of removing the build up takes about four times as long to remove as it does to apply, but I'm able to get back to the original feel of a new prosthetic.  The only thing, DO NOT remove the build up and try to wear the prosthetic immediately (it tears very easily).  Let it air dry several hours (day or more is better).  I also use water based makeup (like the stuff used by the artists that paint kids faces with butterflys, flowers, etc...), which I apply to the outside of the prosthesis as I'm applying my makeup.  This helps with blending.  I learned the hard way long, long ago that I don't tolerate grease paint, so it took me several decades to figure out that I could use makeup without using grease paint.  Plus the clean-up, a shower, is very quick (spend 10 to 12 hours in costume and see how much you want a shower) and I'm back to my mudane self.  
Here is a link to a picture of my charater:
http://profiles.yahoo.com/gravitymaster
Now it only takes me 45 - 50 minutes to apply the makeup, when I first started out, it was 1 1/2 - 2 hours.  Practice makes faster...}};-)

Dead link:
> Here's a friend of mine who put up instructions on headcasting:
> http://www.celtic-klingon.com/  
Logged

Lord Nor LlaH Bumba
Klan of LlaH, Chaouw Empire
Da'Har Master, House Ki'RK
Kaz Son of Maktan
Klingon Conversationalist
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 110



« Reply #13 on: 06 26, 2006, 07:09: AM »

This thread hasn't been replied to in a while, so I thought I'd add to the pot. I am currently instructing a trusted friend on molding technique (by way of making a cast of his face- hey, learn by experiencing i say) to make a full cast of my head form alginate (a blueish silicony type o stuff reinforced by a shell of plaster bandage.  What I hope to do, after getting a plaster positive and modelling my forehead with clay (and then plaster casting that) is use a cold foam kit from a costume store and reinforce the foam latex (brushed in liquid form within the negative of the clay klingon forehead) with strips of veil mesh (from the fabric store) along the outline of the head piece and across from between the brow to top of head for strenghth.  I'll then paint over the finished piece with thin layers of acrylic to match my painted skin tone.  I have prepared myself for the fact that even though I am reinforcing the foam latex, because of its delicate nature, I will have to make several copies in this batch to last the years.  I'll report back with my job when it's done. I hope fellow my Klingons can be proud of my work at the next con.
-Kaz
Logged

Ars Brevis Vita Brevis
Klythe
ngem Sargh lIghwI' pagh cha'
Administrator
Thought Master
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1071


When a show of teeth doesn't work, bite deeply.


WWW
« Reply #14 on: 06 26, 2006, 07:36: PM »

    I look forward to hearing the results.  I wish I had more space and an assistant to work on my own head.   

    I'm guessing that low long your forehead lasts depends as much on how often you wear it and how you take care of it when removing and after removing it.
Logged
Kaz Son of Maktan
Klingon Conversationalist
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 110



« Reply #15 on: 06 29, 2006, 01:21: AM »

I'm guessing that how long your forehead lasts depends as much on how often you wear it and how you take care of it when removing and after removing it.

Yeah, from what I hear, wear n tear on the edges is unavoidable. But I'm gonna be a s delicate as possible. I'm kinda goin all out crazy on this.  I'm not using silicon or hot foam casting (both WAY too expensive), but I did want to get as good a quality as I could (read: afford), buying supplies bit by bit.  I'm an actor by profession (ideally) and an artist before that, so I've collected the supplies I would need NOW over the years: Hair, film lace and wig needles for my klingon mane, the cold foam kit and alginate for various tiny make up projects (I'm crossing my fingers that they're still good), and the fabric for my uniform.  Can you believe, I'm going to actually mold my torso with plaster bandage to make a dress form? Wheeehhh! It's a youthful dream that if I'm worth any Klingon blood, I'll see through before September. Kirk n Spock et al are coming to town for the 40th Ann. of Star Trek. We shall see..
-Kaz
« Last Edit: 06 02, 2009, 06:52: AM by Kaz Son of Maktan » Logged

Ars Brevis Vita Brevis
Kehlan
Senior Strategist
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 521



WWW
« Reply #16 on: 06 29, 2006, 06:44: AM »

The warrior who makes my headpieces for me, tells me that he uses copydex instead of latex.  apparently it is just a good but is much much cheaper. 

Certainly the headpieces made of this stuff have served me well and stood up to a fair bit of abuse from me.

Kehlan
Logged

Captain Kehlan
USS Endeavour NCC-71805
Federation/Klingon Rapid Response Fleet
L'Shar Anara Rokta
Novice
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 11


« Reply #17 on: 07 25, 2007, 07:58: PM »

I made my original headpiece about 15 years ago by a slow process of building up liquid latex on a latex base over strips of flesh-colored yarn.  Over the yarn I laid thin strips of thin cotton muslin fabric and shaped the look I wanted.  I just kept adding latex in layers until I achieved the proper appearance.  This ended up being rather light weight and very easy to wear with a little spirit gum to attach it.  My wig is a seperate piece.

Currently, I've decided to add a tortoise shell, and I have cut the ridges from the original headband to re-use.  The process will be the same, building slowly with liquid latex (that's the medium I'm used to working with) onto a new base with the ridges and T-shell.  Since this headpiece will be heavier then the first one, I plan of adding an elastic band from the sides of the head that will go around the back of my head.  My wig will cover the rest.


The warrior who makes my headpieces for me, tells me that he uses copydex instead of latex.  apparently it is just a good but is much much cheaper. 

Certainly the headpieces made of this stuff have served me well and stood up to a fair bit of abuse from me.

Kehlan


I'll have to locate some copydex and see how it works for my future headpieces.  Thank you for this information!

L'Shar Anara Rokta


[Edit:  merged double post -Klythe]
« Last Edit: 07 26, 2007, 07:23: PM by Klythe » Logged

L'Shar Anara of house Rokta
ter'eS
Discoursing Diplomat
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 352



WWW
« Reply #18 on: 07 26, 2007, 02:34: PM »

The warrior who makes my headpieces for me, tells me that he uses copydex instead of latex.  apparently it is just a good but is much much cheaper. 

Certainly the headpieces made of this stuff have served me well and stood up to a fair bit of abuse from me.

Kehlan


I'll have to locate some copydex and see how it works for my future headpieces.  Thank you for this information!

L'Shar Anara Rokta

When I googled copydex, I found that it's used as an adhesive, and is basically what we call rubber cement in the USA.  How can you make a 3-D headpiece out of adhesive?
Logged
Klythe
ngem Sargh lIghwI' pagh cha'
Administrator
Thought Master
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1071


When a show of teeth doesn't work, bite deeply.


WWW
« Reply #19 on: 07 26, 2007, 07:01: PM »

    Liquid Latex is also used as an adhesive sometimes, but when slush cast in many thin layers it adheres to itself while semiwet, but once dry not to anything else.   Rubber cement is actually very similar to liquid latex.  Ever get liquid latex in your clothes?  Tell me that isn't an adhesive. Cheesy Klingon Grin   
 
    In fact looking it up, the copydex is a latex-based rubber cement.  So really the biggest difference as far as I can tell is the solvent that keeps the latex a fluid until it dries.  Liquid latex uses ammonia, American rubber cement uses hexane or heptane.  I'm not sure what copydex uses...
Logged
Kehlan
Senior Strategist
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 521



WWW
« Reply #20 on: 07 26, 2007, 07:14: PM »

Yes copydex is a glue, i use it myself as its one of the best craft glues around.  I don't know much about the process of turning it into a klingon headpiece but i do know that the ones I have look good and are very durable.  If nothing else, its worth experimenting with.

Kehlan
Logged

Captain Kehlan
USS Endeavour NCC-71805
Federation/Klingon Rapid Response Fleet
L'Shar Anara Rokta
Novice
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 11


« Reply #21 on: 07 27, 2007, 07:25: PM »

I am currently working with a different latex product, and so far I am very pleased with the progress.  I found it at my local crafts store, and it's called "Mold Builder, Liquid Latex Rubber," by the company Castin' Crafts.  It's thicker than what I'm used to (from the theatrical supply store), and the color is yellowish and a bit odd, but I'll add flesh tone pigment later to even it out.  So far I really like this product.

I made a 100 % cotton muslin half-cap (the front half, ear to ear and from the nose to the top of my head) and put it over a styrofoam head covered with aluminuim foil.  I stragegically put rubberbands around the half cap to make it stay put, then covered it with 1 coat of latex, carefully avoiding the rubber bands.  Under my A/C, it took about 1 hour to dry.  I added the salvaged ridges (from my last headpiece), and 'glued' it to the cap, let that dry and added the turtle shell.  That's drying right now.  I'll cover the shell with strips of thin cloth and latex, 2-3 coats.  Then I'll check it after drying to see what else I need to do before I attach it to the hairband.

BTW, I've read some folks have heavy ridges that give them a problem when worn, and have a solution.  I use a metal wire hairband (twisted wire) with 1-inch long metal teeth.  I've used these bands for a long time (especially on my Renaissance French Hoods), and they keep everything in place perfectly.  I've even gone up to 15 hours comfortably wearing there wire headbands.  I find mine at Wally-World or sometimes at the dollar store.  They're easy to attach to headpieces and the metal wire teeth bend to as not to tear your own hair or jab your scalp.

I'll post pics when I have them.

Qa'Pla!

L'Shar Anara
Logged

L'Shar Anara of house Rokta
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!