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Author Topic: Klingon Lifespan  (Read 14149 times)
Honor_and_Glory
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« on: 10 09, 2003, 03:28: AM »

posted on 6-22-2003 at 09:13 PM

Klingon Lifespan

I am wondering if anyone knows the approximate lifespan of a Klingon Male versus a Klingon Female? Specifically, if a Klingon male does not die a honorable death, but serves honorably, how long might he live until the time of a natural death?
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qurgh
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« Reply #1 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:31: AM »

posted on 6-23-2003 at 01:01 PM

All I know is that Klingons have an average lifespan of 150-200 years.

This is based on the fact that Koloth was alive in approx 2267 and died in 2372. 2372 - 2267 = 105 years. Koloth was an adult in 2267, around 30ish, so that put him at somewhere around 135-145 when he was killed. He most likely could have gone on living a fair bit more.

I used to have more infomation, but it got lost in a hard drive move Sad
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Honor_and_Glory
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« Reply #2 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:33: AM »

posted on 6-23-2003 at 01:34 PM

Whoa that long, well hey thanks for getting back to me with the info, it sucks though that you lost some information in a hard drive move.

I was wondering, do you have any idea if Klingons are more or less likely to contract diseases like the common flu or other standard Terran diseases.
« Last Edit: 10 09, 2003, 03:34: AM by Honor_and_Glory » Logged
qurgh
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« Reply #3 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:35: AM »

posted on 6-24-2003 at 01:06 PM

From what I know Klingons tend to be less likely to contract diseases than most races, and when they do they do not affect them as badly due to the fact that they have so many redundent systems.
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Kesvirit
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« Reply #4 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:42: AM »

posted on 6-30-2003 at 05:24 AM

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quoth Honor_and_Glory I am wondering if anyone knows the approximate lifespan of a Klingon Male versus a Klingon Female?
Why do you think they are different?

Quote
Specifically, if a Klingon... does not die a honorable death, but serves honorably,
A contradiction! }}>:-E

Quote
how long might he live until the time of a natural death?
As with most things Klingon, it varies according to source material. Unfortunately for scientists everywhere, the political regime under which the research was taken and the results published have a strong influence on methodology and conclusions.

TFR holds that a child reaches the age of majority at the age of 10 Homeworld years, and most Klingon in military service are "retired" one way or another around age 40 but may return to duty if they are able and needed. According to FASA the average maximum life expectancy to be around 60 Terran years for Imperials, with Human fusions living slightly longer, and Romulan fusions living a bit longer than that (due to the influence of vulcanoid genes). A notable exception is the enigmatic Emperor Keth, "The Centenarian", whose long life and rein have never been satifactorily explained.

Cultural practices aside, it is the consensus of the Thought Masters of Medicine that the accelerated progression of life stages and higher metabolism relative to most humanoids result in a shorter lifespan: the organism simply burns itself out faster. Whether the double liver system and high BMR (basal metabolic rate) as indicated by the relatively high body temperature is a cause or a result of this is a matter of some controversy. For reasons unknown the cardiovascular system gives tends to be the limiting factor in the natural lifespan.

The account of Imperial scienctific practices described by escaped Federation subjects in Dwellers in the Crucible does not give a precise age, but says that Human middle age is indeed old for a Klingon. They accuse Klingons in the military of being particularly insecure about appearing weak and obsolete due to advancing age. This manifests itself in a desire to look younger, and the use of dyes to camoflauge gray hair is not uncommon.

The grossly revised "Blood Oath" contadicts these numbers. The above model would have put our three leads perhaps in their early thirties at the time of their first appearance. Even taking into account the numerous internal inconsistancies inherent in neotrek, Kor, Koloth, and Kang should have been in the vicinity of 120-130 Terran years of age. Each appears to be in good health and to have several good years yet ahead of him, though I think that zan qurgh's estimate of 150-200 years is overly optimistic. I would be interested to know the source of his information. 150 years would be extremely old indeed; 200 years approaches Vulcan lifespan ranges, and I have seen no indication of Romulan or other vulcanoid ancestry in any of these individuals.

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quoth qurgh From what I know Klingons tend to be less likely to contract diseases than most races, and when they do they do not affect them as badly due to the fact that they have so many redundent systems.
From whence does the one know this, and what is the reasoning behind the statement? "Redundant systems" does not quarantee an increased resistance to disease. It merely means that there is twice as much tissue to be affected. It does not mean that that the body is equipped with a set of spare parts as a ground vehicle is with spare tires, or that these redundancies can integrate themselves into the rest of a given physiological system once the primary organ(s) have been compromised or destroyed.

The more thought I give to it, the more I am convinced that the whole concept of brak'lul is scientifically flawed and evolutionarily unlikely. I will investigate further and post the results at a later date.

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« Last Edit: 11 01, 2003, 06:34: PM by Kesvirit » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:45: AM »

posted on 7-25-2003 at 09:53 PM

Somewhere in the far recesses of my brain, I seem to recall reading something about Klingons having a life-span between that of Humans and Vulcans.
This is purely based on something I read once, and since I can't recall what or when, it should be taken with a heaping helping of your favorite choice of seasoning. Smiley
As far as the average sickness, ie, colds and flus, I would have to say that Klingons are just as susceptible to them as anyone else, however it is unlikely that Human virii/bacteria would be of consequence, due to the differnce in physiology.
However, the common bug, that doesn't affect Humans, or vice versa, doesn't affect Klingons, could likely cause trouble for the other. The hardiness of the common virus and bacteria cannot be underestimated.
But if Klingon body tempature is significantly different from the Human, in either direction, Human virii and bacteria would be unable to survive, since they are only able to survive in a narrow temperature range that is around the average Human body temp.
So basically what I'm saying, is we have no freakin' clue. :lol:
Oh yeah, "I'm baaaacccckkkkkk!!!!!!!!" Cheesy
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Klythe
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« Reply #6 on: 10 09, 2003, 03:48: AM »

posted on 8-17-2003 at 07:01 AM

Let is be clear, we are talking about biological lifespan which is the upper limit of age possible for individuals of a species under optimum condidions. We are not talking about life expenctancy which is a measure of probability given prevailing non-optimal conditions. Disease resistance, redundant organs(for increase chances for survival against injuries, not disease), and available medical care affect the life expenctancy, they do not affect the biological lifespan.

I believe it was "The Biology of Star Trek" that cited recent studies of the lifespan of terran species. Although metabolism is a factor, the largest determining factor is that the lifespan is inversely proportional to the birthrate. The higher the biological birthrate, the longer the biological lifespan.

Obviously this is a natural control mechanism to regulate population on a long term basis. I do not how much this biological principle affects the technological advances in human life expenctancy (not lifespan) from the late industrial age to the modern warp era and the coinsiding reduction in birthrates among the most technological advanced populations.
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Kherkh
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« Reply #7 on: 02 10, 2004, 10:11: PM »

They'd I'd presume be about same age as McCoy. McCoy made into into TNG times but was excessivley geezerly (at the age of 136) Why Koloth and others were still pretty fit and able to take on the Albino and fight gloriously.

I wonder if the ENT Klingon made it into TOS days.  
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voraq
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« Reply #8 on: 02 12, 2004, 07:30: AM »

It appears that most Klingon's do not live their full life expectancy.  With a lifestyle such as the Klingons have it seems more likely that most Klingons will die in battle before they reach the ages that Kor, Koloth, and Kang reached.

There are two reason that Klingons live as long as those three have.  The first reason, and probably most common, is that the particular Klingon is such a good warrior that noone can match him or her (such is the case with Kor, Koloth, and Kang).  The only other reason that I can imagine, and has been touched on in the show's is that the Klingon is living out a life free of the battles, in which case he or she is considered to be living in dishonor.  This scenario is given by the second officer of the Klingon Cruiser Pagh.  
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Klythe
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« Reply #9 on: 02 13, 2004, 01:56: PM »

Not all battles are life and death.   Some battles are not even violent.   You can bet that K'mpec was not personally fighting many battles, but K'mpec was not living in dishonor.

    There are other honorable ways to serve than just frontline fighting and leadership.  Thought Masters(oldschool) and Story Tellers(neotrek) are also honorable professions where older Klingons may continue to serve often at a distinct advantage over thier younger comrades.   There are probably other occupations as well, that I have not considered.

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HAG>Specifically, if a Klingon... does not die a honorable death, but serves honorably,

Kesv>A contradiction! }}>:-E

    I do not see the contradiction here.  If you provide skillful service, that is service skillful enough to continue allow you to continue to serve in the White Fleet (the White Fleet is this life, the Black Fleet is the next), why is that less than honorable?
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Kesvirit
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« Reply #10 on: 02 13, 2004, 08:32: PM »

The one speaks wisely, but misunderstands my objections.

Ending one's life in pieces in glorious battle does not mean that one has lived an honorable life. It is easy to commit acts of treachery and avoid having to face the follout by staging a suicide mission.

Even if I were to follow Honor_and_Glory's overly simplistic example, the only conclusion that I could draw from it was that the individual in question had died in the right place at the right time. Many a Klingon, warrior or otherwise, has lived a less-than-exemplary life, yet died under fortuitous (read: "glorious" or "honorable") circumstances. I firmly believe that anyone who has lived and served honorably carries those characteristics with them into death and beyond (if one subscribes to an afterlife scenario -- I personally do not), regardless of the manner in which the physical heart is stilled. Honorable death does not require that one be killed in the line of duty. Without taking into account the nature of the actions and spirit of the individual in question, it is no more honorable than dying in one's sleep of old age. (At whatever that age may be.)

"And I am unanimous in that." -- Mrs. Slocombe

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« Last Edit: 02 13, 2004, 08:43: PM by Kesvirit » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: 03 25, 2004, 01:47: PM »

I am not sure that the lifespan of a Klingon could be acurately gauged, simply because very few Klingons live under optimum circumstances. Regardless of the debate over the percentage of Klingons who are warriors in the (military) sense, we do know that a great many Klinogns fight in a great many battles. From this we can assume the earth to be banana shaped.....I mean we can assume that a great many Klingons die in battle. This limits the number of Elderly Klingons we have avalible to study. The only Trek "cannon" references we have to go by are Kang, Koloth & Kor on DS9, and prior to Blood Oath we could have assumed them to have died in battle long ago.

As for Emperor Keth, in my opinion what made him so outstanding was not that he lived to a ripe old age, but that he lived to a ripe old age without being challenged for the throne or dying in some other battle. I think this speakes to his skill more than his genetics, however. It may also be a demonstration of how respected a leader he was, that none challenged him. I do however think that the ability to challenge for the throne is a Klingon form of checks and ballances that keeps the empire on the right path, so I do not see there being many more centernarians.

I also have theorized that Klingons have conquored most diseases, and therefore are not all that effected by them. I base this on what we know of 23rd & 24th century medicine combined with Klingon culture, and the little bits we have seen of Klingon medicine. When Worf lost his spine (I know there is an obvious joke here) The Klingon doctor was not interested in there being a surgical remedy. Such injuries were fatal, or if not quickly became so at the family's hands. Look at Martoks eye, or lack therof. I realize that Klingons wear their scars proudly, but here is an example of an unrepaired organ loss, which could be a battle liability.

My guess is that Klingons have not developed much in the way of advanced surgery for trauma/injury scenarios. This is because such injuries fall into three categories. First fatal, second soon to be fatal, third non fatal scars of honor. None of these would require surgical remedies. We know there are Klingon doctors, so I theorize that Klingon medicine has been primarily focused on disease eradication. Imagine how shameful it would be for a mighty warrior to die from a headcold. We know that the federation has found a cure for Cancer, and we know that the Klingons have had most technology longer than humans. Couple this with the fact that they have not had to develop traumatic medicine, and we get a nearly disease free empire. Because of the Klingon habit of conquoring strange new worlds and inter=acting with strange new people, they would likely be exposed to a great many more diseases that humans. Klingons expand the empire faster and bloodier than humans do the federation. This would increase the need for such medicinal sciences.
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