The Rites of Ascension

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weslipuqlod:
posted on 10-14-2002 at 09:58 PM

The Rites of Ascension

I would like to have discussion on the Rites of Ascension. Over the years we have subscribed to a specific belief and ritual within House t'raQ. I outline them here for thoughts and discussion:

A Klingon is not born a warrior, being a warrior is something that must be earned. Considered an adult once able to yield a blade, when a youth becomes of age to take arms, he must be ceremoniously initiated. This ascension into adulthood is ceremoniously marked by three rites of passage.

The First Rite of Ascension, peHtay:
In the seventh month of a child's ninth year he reaches the age of inclusion, peHghep. Before his family the child will pledge his intention to become a warrior by lighting the ceremonial Qo'to'vo' candle. Qo'to'vo' candles represent the fire within the heart of a warrior, the first step on the path to adulthood. Once pledged, the youth is presented with the traditional ghojmeHtaj, boy's knife. Now the childhood games and stories, so familiar, will take on new meaning as the youth's education and training increases to prepare him for the way of the warrior.

The Second Rite of Ascension, qutluchtay:
This ceremonial passage is not described in most non-Klingon literature because of its offensive nature to many cultures. Marked in the seventh month of the youth's twelfth year, this ceremony celebrates the young Klingon preparing to be a warrior by allowing him to attack an opponent and actually draw blood for the first time.

The Third Rite of Ascension, nentay:
During the seventh month of the young Klingon's fifteenth year he attains the age of ascension, nenghep. On the eve of this third rite of passage a traditional celebration is held. Declared a lopno', the youth, soon to be a man, is presented with numerous gifts, all of which are weapons or are rich in family tradition or value. The celebration itself is a test of stamina with regards to drinking, feasting, story-telling, and mu'QaDveS. A test which will continue throughout the night and marks the young Klingon's first consumption of alcohol. As the first light of dawn breaks the horizon, those celebrants still conscious will enter the ritual chamber and stand witness to the nentay and the passage of youth into manhood using the traditional oy'naQ, painsticks.

maq'mang:
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The First Rite of Ascension, peHtay:
Methinks that this needs be more generalized for not every child would choose for a Warrior. Not to mention that for a Militaristic Society like the Klingons if 2 or 3 chose other professions to every on that becomes a warrior for them to survive.

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The Second Rite of Ascension, qutluchtay:
:D  The blood thirsty being in me loves this context. Would certainly make life interesting. ;)

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The Third Rite of Ascension, nentay:
B) It's not Klingon if it does not end in a party.

majQa', It was well written. It is refreshing to read ones words, considered and measured and presented well.

Seng,
Maq'mang taI Veska

qoSagh:
Well written, for some reason, even though I have written many Klingon rituals, I have never written a Rite of Ascension. I have Child Naming and then Initiation into our Order which by it's very nature would happen after one has "become" a warrior.

As for not all Klingons becomming warriors, I have two thoughts. First is that because the role of the Warrior is so revered in society, that only those that choose this path would need to ascend to a higher status. So there is no need for such a rite for a non-warrior.

The second and I am sure a bit less copnventional is that the rite itself has become less of a martial reality and more ceremonial for modern Klingons, in that everyone regardless of profession goes through the rites. What the one is ascending to is not so much the actual role of combatant but the ideal of the warrior, which would cross all lines of actual jobs.

Klythe:
I would like to point out not only is warrior assumed, judging from the pronouns so is male...


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The First Rite of Ascension, peHtay:
In the seventh month of a child's ninth year he reaches the age of inclusion, the child will pledge his intention to become a warrior by lighting the ceremonial Qo'to'vo' candle.

    This is likely to have it's basis in oldschool fandom, where the Klingons with shorter lifespans (60 instead of well over 120) have "A night of Coosing" on a cloudless night around their tenth birthday.   One parent(or perhaps both), take the child under the naked stars to declare thier genreal carrer, Navy, Marines, Administration, Science, Merchant, etc...  And discuss what support will still be available to the child when they go to the appropriate academy for their chosen carrer.   Arrangemnets are made and if accepted the child enters the appropriate carreer academy shortly there after.

   Personally, I think it makes a lot of sence for warriors to have shorter lifespans.  Since the death rate is high in times of war, so must the birthrate.   But in times of peace there is nothing to balance the birthrate, if there is a long lifespan.   Birthrate can be adjusted with social pressures, but it is slow to respond.   Biologically there is little competive advantage to an older population for the Klingons.  Unlike hyoomins where longer life allows you to accumlate more knowledge and money exponentially, honor accumulates more linearly.   The mone honor you have does not make earning more honor easier, it may make it harder...

maq'mang:
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As for not all Klingons becomming warriors, I have two thoughts. First is that because the role of the Warrior is so revered in society, that only those that choose this path would need to ascend to a higher status. So there is no need for such a rite for a non-warrior.

The second and I am sure a bit less copnventional is that the rite itself has become less of a martial reality and more ceremonial for modern Klingons, in that everyone regardless of profession goes through the rites. What the one is ascending to is not so much the actual role of combatant but the ideal of the warrior, which would cross all lines of actual jobs.


That Klingons are status and ceremonially motivated is a given for them culturally regardless of the individuals chosen profession or "calling". Everything that we have that is cannon suggests this as well as the needs for such a culture to collectively advance.

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