Klingon Imperial Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
12 12, 2017, 08:07: AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Realtime chats are now following a freeform schedule.  If you would like to chat with you fellows please see the It's Talk Time thread for more info or to schedule a chat.
11894 Posts in 1664 Topics by 689 Members
Latest Member: regdun234
* Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
+  Klingon Imperial Forums
|-+  Other Klingon-related Topics
| |-+  The Klingon Science Lab
| | |-+  Klingon Biology & Physiology
| | | |-+  Anatomy of speech organs and Neandertals
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Anatomy of speech organs and Neandertals  (Read 17594 times)
Mule
Scribe
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« on: 04 25, 2008, 02:01: AM »

Klingons are very independant and less interdependant than Terrans.
Verrry interesting. As I read this, I am watching a program on the Science Channel about human evolution. They are at the end of the story comparing Homo Sapiens with their cousins Homo Neanderthal. Both species were equally intelligent (if there's anything to brain size). One-on-one in any contest of strength and stamina, my money is on the Neanderthal.

So Neanderthals are as smart as current day Terrans and they were, as individuals, better suited for survival. Why are they extinct and Homo Sapiens still thriving? The answer is that the Neanderthal larynx was not as developed as Homo Sapien. In other words, if they could speak, they had difficulty doing so. Language and the organization of activity it brings about made Homo Sapiens superior.

Kingons may be strong, but without organization and communication, they are doomed to extinction.
Logged

A Klingon pledges his loyalty to the Empire; he pledges his life to his comrade-in-arms.
Klythe
ngem Sargh lIghwI' pagh cha'
Administrator
Thought Master
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1071


When a show of teeth doesn't work, bite deeply.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: 04 28, 2008, 04:13: PM »

    Well brains size is a factor, but isn't the only factor in determining intelligence.  We don't really have a very accurate way of measuring intelligence in live subjects, much less long dead fossils.  Though I've heard it said that Neandertals were smart enough to master complex tasks such as flying a commercial airliner, but we have know way of knowing if that is true, or if the neandertals would have produced an Albert Einstein or a Steven Hawking if they were not supplanted by homo sapiens.
 
    There is no such thing as being better suited for survival, only better suited for survival in a specific environment.   Neadertals were better adapted for survival in the Ice age European north.  Homo sapiens were well adapted to life in the Fertile cresent, where high protein cereal grains like wheat and barley and animal domestication allowed a surplus of food to be created and stored, allowing the freedom for some individuals to persue other projects such as more advanced building materials and metal working.

    An undecended larynx does not mean it is more difficult or requires more effort to speak, only that the pitch may have been higher, or maybe not as many animals including wolves and elk have larynxes that can decend deeper in their throats when the need to make deeper noises.  Higher pitches are often easier to pick out from natural background noises which are usually much lower in tone, but don't carry as far.  For another thread on a similar topic see Origin of speech in Klingons.
« Last Edit: 04 28, 2008, 09:31: PM by Klythe » Logged
KlingonAndorianOrion
Scribe
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 16


« Reply #2 on: 03 03, 2010, 01:05: AM »

I don't really by into that theory about Neanderthals.  If they were as smart as moden humans then surely they would have developed a language based on hand signing or tongue clicking given the long period of time they would have had to observe humans communicating with each other. 
Logged
Klythe
ngem Sargh lIghwI' pagh cha'
Administrator
Thought Master
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1071


When a show of teeth doesn't work, bite deeply.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: 03 03, 2010, 04:22: AM »


     I don't think we don't know if Neanderthals had a language or not.  The first preserved writing is much more recent than their extinction.  But verbal language doubtlessly existed much earlier.  But as spoken language leaves no lasting traces, we can make our best guess with the evidence.   Some believe they had language with a smaller range of sounds than most modern languages.  English has 44 distinct sounds while Central Rotokas has the fewest with as few as 11 (if you don't count vowel length or dipthongs).  The biggest difference appears to be that Homo Sapien languages seem to have at least five basic pure vowel sounds, while the last article I read suggested that some scientists think that a Neanderthal language would have had only 3.  Then again, some of those articles suggest that the neanderthals were not necesarrily killed off entorely but some genemixing could have occured between neanderthals and modern Homo Sapien Sapiens.

    I have trouble believing the difference of vowel inventory caused the neaderthal's extinction. A much simpler explanation is that the Homo Sapien Sapiens came up from more temperate climates which were able to sustain larger populations which would present a significant advantage in a war of attrition.

Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!