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Author Topic: Blood Stew - Chocolate Meat - Only for the Brave  (Read 12696 times)
Kaz Son of Maktan
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« on: 09 26, 2007, 03:57: AM »

I started ruminating a few days ago, on what would be a more "authentic" approximation of Klingon cuisine.  To my mind, especially after just reading the food section of Marc Okrand's Klingon for the Galactic Traveller, I figured a well balanced meal to be Udon noodles tossed with Hoisin Sauce, raw veggies, and sashimi drizzled with soy sauce (or better than that, Poki).  To go further into raw animal meat and real worms would seem to be too dangerous, yet tempting...
Then I just saw a History special on the Spartans and a concoction called Melas Zomos was mentioned. It was a soup or drink made from pig's blood and vinegar. Sounds unpalatable- for a Human.  Which brings me to Chocolate Meat. When I was young, my dad, an excellent cook, would make (and still makes) this big dark stew with chopped pork that we'd eat over rice. To get me to eat the stew, my parents said it was dark because "there's chocolate in the sauce". Well, one day in my adolescent years, I strolled into the kitchen and saw an horrific site- my dad was pouring a gallon jug of blood straight into a big pot! Yup, the Chocolate was pig's blood. Well, suffice it say, I did not come near that dish for a long while. But I could not stay away- it's too darn good!  So, here for the brave, I have included 2 links to Chocolate Meat recipes, or as it is really called, Dinuguan.  This is basically my offering as a meal in that one-step-closer category to "authentic" Klingon food. Anyone brave enough to make and eat this please tell me how the experience was.
To be sure, my dad's recipe does not include liver, only chopped pork.  I have not tried to make these particular recipes listed myself, so I hold no responsibility. But it is a simple recipe. qapla'!

http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/filipino/blood-stew1.html
http://www.pinoycook.net/cooking-food/filipino/pork-dinuguan/2/
« Last Edit: 09 28, 2007, 01:47: AM by Kaz Son of Maktan » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: 10 11, 2007, 06:06: AM »

Quote
Then I just saw a History special on the Spartans and a concoction called Melas Zomos was mentioned. It was a soup or drink made from pig's blood and vinegar. Sounds unpalatable- for a Human.

I’ve had a variant of the Melas Zomos with corn meal mixed into it. I didn’t particularly care for it, but could certainly learn to live with it. As it was it gave me a stomach ache, though I think that was a result of the acidity of the vinegar. I have similar problems with a lot of salad dressings. Makes it easier for me to avoid eating my vegetables.

I declined the bull’s blood/semen drink.

Many Humans have found it palatable enough to incorporate it into their food economies. Blood is very nuturitious, but spoils easily. The vinegar keeps it from clotting. Many East African peoples make the most of their cattle by bleeding them -- a beast can be “milked” of its blood frequently in small amounts, but can only be slaughtered once. Mongol soldiers were able to travel with very little provisions because they bled their mounts and pack animals. Tięt cahn is a spiced blood soup eaten in Viet Nam. Duck’s blood soup is a treat in Poland. Look at how common blood sausage is: blood sausage = black sausage = boudin rouge (Cajun) = morcilla (Spanish) = blutwurst (German) =  black pudding (UK/Ireland) = krovyanka(Russia).

Using the blood of an animal demonstrates the wisdom of fully utilizing all available resources.  To discard it would be very wasteful.
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Kaz Son of Maktan
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« Reply #2 on: 10 13, 2007, 07:53: PM »

True. True.  I'll be sure to check out the recipes for all these worldly cuisines, (although I probably won't be making them soon.) Thank you for sharing your knowledge.


[Edit -- More on blood foods may be found in the Rokeg Blood Pie thread.]
« Last Edit: 10 14, 2007, 02:41: AM by Kesvirit » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: 04 16, 2008, 07:16: AM »

Hi, all. I'm a Filipino, and 'dinuguan' (literally, 'something cooked in blood') is one of my faves. The more 'civilized' versions consist of just the pig's muscle tissue, but for the purist, it must include innards like intestine, liver, heart and lung, pancreas, and so on. (I understand from Neelix's cookbook that lungs are not sold as food in the US, but they are quite common here.) There is a version that uses chicken, including the feet, but I don't care for it personally.

There is a diner outsdide the school where I used to teach which I have nicknamed my Klingon Restaurant. It serves goodies like dinuguan, chili soy pork intestines and sweetened pork face. I love the stuff.   

(WARNING: Next passage requires a strong stomach.)

BTW, there is another Filipino dish that bears a striking similarity to a Klingon one. You remember the one where an animal's stomach is used as a food processor, and the stomach contents and animal are eaten? I read an account how in World War 2 an American was stuck in enemy-occupied Philippines, and some natives introduced him to that very dish, but using a dog.

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« Reply #4 on: 04 22, 2008, 12:30: PM »

Dinuguan sounds delicious!
Especially when I count on European kitchen laws & habits, I think this could be pretty palatable...
Blood sausage is also nice, imo, and although I've yet to try it, Haggis (with a little less oats) could also be included in the Klingon Kitchen.

I'll have to ask my friends about dinuguan (the far-eastern ones...)...

Balut (that's another of these asian dishes...) I don't think I'd be able to stomach...
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« Reply #5 on: 04 23, 2008, 02:40: AM »

Dinuguan tastes very much like blood sausage, but piquant from the vinegar. Haggis is one of those dishes I have included in my gotta-try-it-before-I-die list. Balut (duck embryos boiled in the shell) only looks revolting. Try eating it in the dark Cheesy It has a somewhat nutty flavor. While Vietnamese eat it, too, they prefer more developed embryos.Filipinos prefer ones where the embryo is still semi-gelatinous.     
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« Reply #6 on: 04 23, 2008, 12:55: PM »

Dinuguan tastes very much like blood sausage, but piquant from the vinegar. Haggis is one of those dishes I have included in my gotta-try-it-before-I-die list. Balut (duck embryos boiled in the shell) only looks revolting. Try eating it in the dark Cheesy It has a somewhat nutty flavor. While Vietnamese eat it, too, they prefer more developed embryos.Filipinos prefer ones where the embryo is still semi-gelatinous.     
I do try to behave more "I can always try..." than "Not for me, thanks". If I am offered balut or monkey brain or for that matter bull testicles, I would at least try one "bite"...

I now recognise my dire need to go to the source and get going with planning this long-though-of trip to the "orient" 8-)
But first I'll visit the Isles of Albion and try some Haggis...
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« Reply #7 on: 04 23, 2008, 10:30: PM »

you'd be quite disappointed by Haggis I'm afraid... its not as exciting or as gory as you think.  sort of like boiled mince.  I've eaten it regularly, mostly on Burns Night when its traditional with Neeps (actually swede, not turnips)

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« Reply #8 on: 04 24, 2008, 05:37: PM »

you'd be quite disappointed by Haggis I'm afraid... its not as exciting or as gory as you think.  sort of like boiled mince.  I've eaten it regularly, mostly on Burns Night when its traditional with Neeps (actually swede, not turnips)

Kehlan
I just want to try it. Even when it is dull and very un-Klingon... 8-)


[Edit -- see the Rokeg Blood Pie and Haggis thread for more on haggis.]
« Last Edit: 04 25, 2008, 03:18: AM by Kesvirit » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: 08 26, 2008, 01:30: AM »

I have personally not been able to stomache haggis in my intire life much to the head of the houses irritation. It smells attrocious. Traditionally is it not allot of the innards of a sheep boiled in its stomache? It proably isnt' now but i think it used to be. Although Tatties and Neeps make everything edible.
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« Reply #10 on: 08 26, 2008, 10:57: PM »

I think that if you give Haggis the curry-treatment (kill it with spices), it can actually be very nice... 8-)
But I still have to try it... Very bad chances though... Can't seem to get myself dreamt to Scotia.
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« Reply #11 on: 08 27, 2008, 12:12: AM »

It also depends on who has cooked it i guess. Even when it is one of the pre made ones from a super market. One of the brands (Accourding to those of my house who lie it) is seriously unpleasant and the other is really nice.
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